WWRD

todaysdocument:

We’re guessing nobody’s giving out Batman No. 1 for #FreeComicBookDay, so here’s the next best thing.
todaysdocument:

Happy 75th Birthday, Batman!
On March 30, 1939, Detective Comics #27 hit newsstands, introducing evil-doers and comic book lovers everywhere to the Caped Crusader.

Batman Comic Book,No. 1 Spring Issue, 1940
From the series: Series : Civil Case Files, compiled 1938 - 1983, Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 - 2009.
From the scope & content note: This comic book was an exhibit in the case titled Fox Publications Inc. v. Detective Comics Inc., Independent News Co. Inc. and Interborough News Co.

todaysdocument:

We’re guessing nobody’s giving out Batman No. 1 for #FreeComicBookDay, so here’s the next best thing.

todaysdocument:

Happy 75th Birthday, Batman!

On March 30, 1939, Detective Comics #27 hit newsstands, introducing evil-doers and comic book lovers everywhere to the Caped Crusader.

Batman Comic Book,No. 1 Spring Issue, 1940

From the series: Series : Civil Case Files, compiled 1938 - 1983, Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 - 2009.

From the scope & content note: This comic book was an exhibit in the case titled Fox Publications Inc. v. Detective Comics Inc., Independent News Co. Inc. and Interborough News Co.

“On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth.”

– In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role o the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)